CAVITY PROTECTION FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

1

TOPICAL FLUORIDE IS BENEFICIAL IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CAVITIES7

Decades of evidence shows that topical fluoride – in other words fluoride that has a direct effect when it interacts with the surface of tooth enamel – is beneficial. This kind of fluoride can be found in mouth rinses. The active compound that provides fluoride in mouth rinses is sodium fluoride (NaF), which commonly makes up about 0.05% of the product.

Fluoride-containing mouth rinses have a lower viscosity than toothpastes, which allows the fluoride to get to hard-to-reach places such as fissures, narrow pits and the areas between teeth.

2

FLUORIDE MOUTHWASH CAN HELP PREVENT PLAQUE, GINGIVITIS AND CARIES1

Researchers have presented proof that there are benefits to using mouthwash. According to studies, mouthwash use reduces the risk of dental plaque, gingivitis and cavities. There are also no major undesirable effects. This includes no evidence of a higher risk of oral cancer for those who use mouthwash that contains alcohol.

Trials that included 8 950 children in an intervention group and 5 713 children in a control group found that use of fluoride mouth rinses reduced the occurrence of cavities by 30%1.

3

MOUTHWASH USED IN COMBINATION WITH TOOTHPASTE IS BENEFICIAL

Mouthwashes used in addition to toothpaste are recommended for patients who easily get cavities7.

Topical fluorides, such as mouth rinses, gels or varnishes, used in conjunction with fluoride toothpaste get better results. Compared with using fluoride toothpaste alone, a combination reduces cavities by 10% on average1.

THE CAVITIES BALANCE3

USING MOUTHWASH REGULARLY REDUCES
THE RISK OF COMMON DENTAL CONDITIONS,
SUCH AS PLAQUE, GINGIVITIS AND CAVITIES1

BACTERIA IN PLAQUE CAN PRODUCE ACIDS
THAT CAUSE A BALANCE-SHIFT IN THE
MINERALISATION OF THE TOOTH SURFACE8

THE SHIFT TO DEMINERALISATION INDUCES
A BREAKDOWN OF ENAMEL
WHICH MAY
RESULT IN CAVITY FORMATION8

WHO CAN BENEFIT MOST FROM USING FLUORIDE MOUTHWASHES7?

Mouth rinses which deliver fluoride are specifically recommended for:

  • Children over 6 years of age with active dental cavities
  • Patients who are susceptible to cavities
  • Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment – to reduce the risk of demineralisation around orthodontic brackets
  • Patients with impeded salivary function
  • Patients with decreased physical dexterity

Although topical fluoride can help in the fight against tooth decay, it is important to note that dental cavities are not caused by a fluoride deficiency in the body7.

PLEASE TAKE NOTE

Fluoride mouth rinses are not recommended for children under the age of 67.

References:

  1. Boyle, P., Koechlin, A. and Autier, P. (2013). Mouthwash Use and the Prevention of Plaque, Gingivitis and Caries. Oral Diseases, 20(1), pp.1-76.
  2. Slot, D.E. et al. (2012) International Journal Dental Hygiene,10, pp.187–197
  3. Featherstone, J. (2000). The Science and Practice of Caries Prevention. The Journal of the American Dental Association, 131(7), pp.887-899.
  4. Canadian Dental Association (CDA). CDA Position on Use of Fluorides in Caries Prevention. (2017). Canadian Dental Association, 1(1), pp.1 - 5.
  1. Clifton PhD, C. (2017). Focus on Fluorides: Update on the Use of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries. Evidence Based Dental Practice, 14(1), pp.96 - 102.
  2. Marinho, V., Higgins, J., Sheiham, A. and Logan, S. (2017). One topical fluoride (toothpastes, or mouthrinses, or gels, or varnishes) versus another for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2004, 1(1), pp.1 - 49.
  3. Ullah, R., Sohail Zafar Mirpurkhas, M. and Al-Munawwarah, A. (2015). ORAL AND DENTAL DELIVERY OF FLUORIDE: A REVIEW. Research review Fluoride, 43(3), pp.195-204.
  4. Featherstone JDB. Aus Dent J 2008;53: 286–291